36 bit color!

Anyway, for the other people in this thread, if your BluRay player
supports deep color, try it with your TV. If your TV supports it,
then leave it be. Deep Color encoded Blurays will look significantly
more live like with Deep Color on.

Toy Story 3 shows an improvement with Deep Color on,
however Celebration Day from Led Zeppelin does not.

So not all BR titles offer Deep Color. Because of the
extra space DC requires, I suspect that shorter movies
only support it.

Enjoy!
 
Toy Story 3 uses Deep Color.

No it doesn't. You still seem to be unclear on what Deep Color, as a function of your player, actually is.

Make of it what you want.
Keep your player and TV at 24 bit, enjoy the original
Bluray specs and have a great time watching movies
as you like them.

I already posted I have it enabled, it doesn't provide *me* with any significant benefit either way. Maybe your player has a really strong postprocessing chip, maybe my tv already upconverts just fine.
 
No it doesn't. You still seem to be unclear on what Deep Color, as a function of your player, actually is.



I already posted I have it enabled, it doesn't provide *me* with any significant benefit either way. Maybe your player has a really strong postprocessing chip, maybe my tv already upconverts just fine.

Of course, the chip maker for the player I have invented a chip to decode
32 bit color from disks that will never exist.

That makes a lot of sense...
 
It doesn't decode 30-36-bit color, it upconverts a 24-bit color space to 30-36-bit. READ THE DAMNED THING YOU POSTED. :nuts:
 
Normally, each pixel of the video image is transmitted using 24-bit data
(8-bit per channel for R, G, B or Y, Cb, Cr). If Deep Colour is supported
on your TV each pixel of the video image can be transmitted using 30-bit
(10-bit per channel) or 36-bit (12-bit per channel) data. The increased bit
depth should result in smoother colour transitions and better gradients
for better picture quality.

This is upconverting.

For BD discs with native deep colour on them

This is bullshit.
 
The upconverting part you are showing is from DVD upconvert.

Of course it's bullshit.

Everyone is wrong but you.

Have a nice day.
 
I have looked into the actual codec specs that clearly show enhancements
were made to improve the Bluray standard and even posted that
info where 4:4:4 color space supports 42 bit (14 bits per channel)
color on Bluray.

They do not use 42 bits though because the capacity required
is like 4 times 36 bits.

Yet you call bullshit and tell me to use google.

My player even had a Deep Color led in the display when it sees it.

But of course, it's one big master plan to contradict you.

So what is the point?

There is not point having a discussion with you because you do not
want to learn anything, you just want to believe you know everything,

So keep doing that.
 
I have looked into the actual codec specs that clearly show enhancements
were made to improve the Bluray standard and even posted that
info where 4:4:4 color space supports 42 bit (14 bits per channel)
color on Bluray.

They do not use 42 bits though because the capacity required
is like 4 times 36 bits.

the h.264/AVC codec has different profiles. It does contain a profile for 4:4:4 color space, but that is NOT the one used in BDs. I already pointed that out above.

My player even had a Deep Color led in the display when it sees it.

Does this LED come on when you enable Deep Color :rolleyes:

I assume you have some kind of Oppo player. By all means google Oppo Deep Color and see what the manufacturer themselves have to say.
 
You've so far failed to substantiate any claims of BDs being produced in anything above 24-bit color. You've posted incorrect interpretation of the video codec color space and the BD standard. You seem to misunderstand how the Deep Color setting on your player works. And *I'm* reading only what I want to see? :nuts:

Here is something from the Oppo BDP-83 manual (2009 model)

At this time, no disc is encoded with Deep Color. Enabling Deep Color will not magically make colors richer, but will help preserve the maximum precision as a result of video processing and picture control adjustment.

Here are pros talking about deep color from 2012:

http://www.avsforum.com/t/1411555/deep-color-test-pattern

Deep Color requires the source to be encoded in Deep Color to have any benefit. There are no consumer sources encoded with Deep Color

Here is a brief overview of how Deep Color settings on players work:

http://forum.bigpicturebigsound.com...op-boxes-etc/1779-what-36-bit-deep-color.html

DeepColor support (available in HDMI 1.3 and above) allows the HDMI spec to support 10-bit, 12-bit and 16-bit color precision. And while it's true that Blu-ray Discs only support 8-bit color encoding (using 4:2:0 chroma subsampling), this doesn't mean that enhanced color precision available in DeepColor is complete marketing hype. Some Blu-ray players with DeepColor support can "upsample" the 8-bit color palate to 10, 12 or 16 bits in order to interpolate intermediate colors between the color values encoded on the disc. This can help to produce smoother color transitions (with no "banding") when such upconverted material is displayed on a DeepColor-compatible display device.

Another way that players and displays can support enhanced color precision is by compensating for color encoding errors that happen as a result of Blu-ray's chroma subsampling scheme. The Blu-ray format itself uses "4:2:0 chroma subsampling." This means that while Black and White data (aka brightness or luma) is stored for each and every one of the 1920x1080 pixels, the color data is only stored for half the pixels vertically and horizontally. So for every block of 4 pixels on the screen, luma data is stored for all 4 pixels while color data is stored once for that 4-pixel block. Because the human eye is much more sensitive to brightness and line detail than to color detail, the additional color data that is discarded is not generally noticeable at normal viewing distances.

Here is the information about h.264/AVC profiles from a link YOU posted:

The standard defines 21 sets of capabilities, which are referred to as profiles, targeting specific classes of applications.

...

High Profile (HiP)
The primary profile for broadcast and disc storage applications, particularly for high-definition television applications (for example, this is the profile adopted by the Blu-ray Disc storage format and the DVB HDTV broadcast service).

And a table of profiles showing their color space:

qEpVGAj.png


So again, tell me how I'm wrong.
 
So a 2009 manual says that no BR disk has Deep Color but a 2013 manual
says some have?

Those are two good links though.

The first one have a lot of back and forth but the second
is a great explanation of color space in general.

Having said this, I will research why the TS3 bluray uses
almost it's entire, two layer movie disk to play the movie
alone, with all other features on the second disk,
which also triggers the DC led on the player...

BTW, the chip maker's specs says it supports Hi444PP,
though of course, it does not says is the source has it.

But it DOES specify that the codec used by Bluray CAN
have, at least, 30 bit color if the publisher wants to include it.
 
So a 2009 manual says that no BR disk has Deep Color but a 2013 manual
says some have?

No, if the 2013 manual (presumably yours) says it will read a disc with native deep color, it doesn't necessarily mean that commercial blu rays are now encoded that way. It might be possible to encode a video source natively by shooting it with a Hi422P or Hi444PP camera and then putting that on a blu ray disc as data. This is not the same as a standard BD, will not play on anything that can't pass higher than 24-bit color space, and is not what movie studios are doing.
 
The Bluray standard did not support 3D, and then it did.

Not only did it support it, it did with backward compatibility.

There are no "standards" in technology, just temporary guidelines.

Since it's inception, it went through 16 updates.

Anyhow, I reached out to the horse, I can't wait to hear
it from the horse's mouth...
 
This thread is educational :) (and funny :D )

Will try it at home, have tons of movies to check.
 
The Bluray standard did not support 3D, and then it did.

Not only did it support it, it did with backward compatibility.

There are no "standards" in technology, just temporary guidelines.

Since it's inception, it went through 16 updates.

Anyhow, I reached out to the horse, I can't wait to hear
it from the horse's mouth...

Well yes there is a standard for the Blu-Ray disc video format. Done to help ensure the disc's are as widely compatible as possible.

The closest reference I can find to any blu-ray release with a great colour depth are the new "Mastered in 4k" release's from Sony. Even though these mention they have support for expanded colour on supported devices, they do not feature a 10-bit encode.

The up coming UDTV standard will officially support 10-bit. So when the 4k TV's hit, we might finally see some commercial content encoded at 10-bit.(probably on an updated UDTV Blu-Ray Spec)
 
This is bullshit.


http://forum.blu-ray.com/showthread.php?t=56642

That's interesting with regard to xvYCC support from a firmware update. Most documentation only relates to xvYCC being supported for AVCHD, but it often also applies to BDMV, mainly because the Blu-ray spec doesn't actually support extended gamut, but Blu-ray movies can be encoded with it.

Oppo players do not support xvYCC. I asked JohnAV over in the Oppo section previously. That includes the latest 103 and 105 models aswell.

And yes you are correct with regards to the difference between Deep Colour and x.v.Colour.
So, extended color gamut seems to be an unofficial bluray extension. enabling deep color mode would allow the player to access the extended gamut colors for output to the TV I'd gather.


http://www.avsforum.com/t/819370/bluray-movies-in-deep-color
xvyCC and deep color are two different things, just to clarify. It looks like the xvyCC technology will give displays like LCD and DLP better color representations. "The existing standard works for most TVs, but it constrains the capabilities of LCD televisions with light-emitting diode (LED) backlights and rear-projection TVs with digital light-processing technology, Murty said." xvyCC also has a benefit in that it supports the bandwidth necessary to display 1440p resolution (wqxga - http://www.audioholics.com/education...s-hdmi-1-3-q-a)
which is 400% more resolution than 720p and 225% more than 1080p

"The new standard will further be enhanced by Deep Color, an existing technology that smoothes out the fine gradients between shades of colors. In some older digital TVs, viewers can see faint bands in a color field as the colors get lighter or darker. In a TV with Deep Color, the bands disappear, and images in shadows become clearer."


A deep color path may help banding, contrast, etc. All TVs do some post processsing. I've been in the service menus... it's amazing. If someone's set is tweaked so that they don't see banding, etc, anyway, then no... removing something non-existant isn't likely to help.
 
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