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Old May 7, 2012, 01:42 PM   #21
Meteor_of_War
USA-holes
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: United States Massachusetts
Posts: 22,235
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mabran View Post
As long as the contrast is not set to overly strong values. even the old plasmas wouldn't burn in. It's the folks that had it cranked to 100 all the time that would have the majority of the issues.

I had one of the first plasmas many moons ago and never once had burn in (and I monitored stocks and helpdesk apps with static screens) sure the pixel shift tweaks helped for extreme scenarios but too much contrast even on modern sets can burn in (although not likely) I walk into some places and wonder how people can watch the screen with the contrast and brightness kicked so high.
I'm betting its simply a case of these people being uninformed on basic calibration methods and their eyes are untrained for what really looks good and bad. Most people out there believe LCDs set in torch mode with over-saturated color look better than a properly ISF and grayscale calibrated plasma. Most of them think the plasma looks very bland and dim compared to theirs, when in actuality it is more natural looking with more accurate colors and gamma.
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