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Old Jan 6, 2013, 11:59 AM   #6
caveman-jim
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poohbear View Post
well haswell is using DDR3, so 2014 at the earliest. Even then, in a recession none of the companies are that enthusiastic about introducing a new format like DD4, especially when u can buy 16gb of DDR3 for $65. 16gb with a Haswell CPU will most probably handle all our computing needs well into 2016. Heck my Sandy bridge @ 4.5 is 2 years old now but i think i'll hold on to it for another 2 years as it burns through everything i throw at it. computer development, especially cpu development, has slowed down to a crawl simply because the software being developed is simply not that demanding. That might change with next gen consoles, but from early reports they're really not gonna be that high end, so a haswell with 16gb DDR3 is gonna last u for a looooooooong time.
This is a very old skool view of the way things work, and incomplete IMO.

Capacity isn't going to be the driving force for the next standard of memory, it's going to be speed and power. DDR4 will allow companies to have faster machines in less power, everybody wants that.

CPU's are gone, we're now in the heterogeneous processing unit era. Everything needs a GPU alongside the CPU, and it has to be a GPGPU at that. This is the new frontier for performance and GPU's love memory bandwidth, that's why we've been stuffing GDDR on video cards long before CPU's got anywhere near the speeds (of course there is a cost model in there too).

The next question is where is the going to be needed first, and that is in mobile computing and server computing, desktop is going to be last to need it. This is because of the two aspects described above, DDR4 will allow devices to run faster in lower power - just what mobile device craves; and servers want this too, now they can run faster in the same power or they can follow the perf efficiency curve down and reduce operating costs at the same time.

Desktops are the least sensitive to power efficiency, hence why we still use 3.5" hard drives, 1.65v RAM, full size optical drives, etc. etc. So we'll see desktops adopt DDR4 for speed only, the emphasis will come when there's a nice lift to DDR3 speeds. It's looking like DDR4 is going to introduce at around DDR3-2400 equivalent speeds so there's could be a nice bump on offer.
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