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Old Aug 8, 2019, 03:25 PM   #299
andino
Radeon Arctic Islands
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: United States Oklahoma
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Originally Posted by bill dennison View Post
Typhoid Intel

https://www.forbes.com/sites/daveywi.../#4de6884c73f8

Quote:
A security vulnerability that affects Windows computers running on 64-bit Intel and AMD processors could give an attacker access to your passwords, private conversations, and any other information within the operating system kernel memory. Users are advised to update Windows in order to mitigate against this new CPU "SWAPGS attack" risk.
What is the SWAPGS attack?

"We call this the SWAPGS attack because the vulnerability leverages the SWAPGS instruction," Bogdan Botezatu, director of threat research and reporting at Bitdefender, says "an under-documented instruction that makes the switch between user-owned memory and kernel memory." Botezatu also says that, at this point, "all Intel CPUs manufactured between 2012 and today are vulnerable to the SWAPGS attack." Which means every Intel chip going back to the "Ivy Bridge" processor is vulnerable if inside a machine running Windows.

However, it appears it is not just Intel CPUs that are affected by the SWAPGS attack vulnerability. According to a Red Hat advisory published August 6th, the threat “applies to x86-64 systems using either Intel or AMD processors.” Something that AMD itself disputes.

An AMD spokesperson pointed me in the direction of a public statement online: "AMD is aware of new research claiming new speculative execution attacks that may allow access to privileged kernel data. Based on external and internal analysis, AMD believes it is not vulnerable to the SWAPGS variant attacks because AMD products are designed not to speculate on the new GS value following a speculative SWAPGS. For the attack that is not a SWAPGS variant, the mitigation is to implement our existing recommendations for Spectre variant 1."

That same Red Hat advisory stated that “based on industry feedback, we are not aware of any known way to exploit this vulnerability on Linux kernel-based systems.” During my briefing with Botezatu, he noted that "Linux machines are also impacted," however, due to the operating system architecture they are "less prone to this type of attack, as it is less reliable." Botezatu says that other operating system vendors are not impacted at this point, "but are still investigating similar attack avenues leveraging the SWAPGS attack."
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