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-   -   Hibernate vs standby. Which should I use? (http://www.rage3d.com/board/showthread.php?t=33856179)

Adanu May 19, 2006 12:20 PM

Hibernate vs standby. Which should I use?
 
I've been having problems with a corrupt sys file making me BSOD 3/5 of the time I boot. At times it gives me bsod on login, sometimes halfway through the desktop startup, sometimes it boots normally. I'm looking to make it so that my computer doesn't completely shut down and it saves the system and driver files without having to reload them, but also turns off almost all of the system to save power.

I'm working on trying to figure out what is causing the corruption, as the file itself seems to be my sound card driver, but an uninstall doesn't effect it it seems. So, for now, I'd like to use a makeshift solution until I can do so. Any advice? I'm using XP home edition.

Adanu May 22, 2006 06:24 AM

So NO one has any advice in this area?

Andy N May 22, 2006 07:49 AM

Maybe you already know this, but here's the difference:

Hibernation saves your memory to the hard disk and switches off the PC. When you turn it back on, the memory contents are loaded from hard disk. That means that both putting the PC into hibernation and turning it on again take some time depending on the amount of memory you have.

Standby doesn't turn the PC off, it usually just switches off hard drives and displays, so it has to be powered but the transitions are very fast.

caveman-jim May 22, 2006 09:29 AM

If you have a corrupt file, I would say stop using standby or hibernation all together. If the system cold boots every time no problems, then it's the power off status/transition that is cause the problems.

A bit more info on what the hardware and drivers are would get you more responses, probably.

Adanu May 22, 2006 09:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Andy N
Maybe you already know this, but here's the difference:

Hibernation saves your memory to the hard disk and switches off the PC. When you turn it back on, the memory contents are loaded from hard disk. That means that both putting the PC into hibernation and turning it on again take some time depending on the amount of memory you have.

Standby doesn't turn the PC off, it usually just switches off hard drives and displays, so it has to be powered but the transitions are very fast.

I don't mind turnign it on, but what I want to know is which one saves the driver files so it doesn't reload them. Until I can find out what the problem is with my dirvers, I'm trying to keep it on but with as little power consumed as possible.

the driver that is causing the problems is TBCWDM.sys I believe. Half the time I reboot or boot into the desktop it gives me a BSOD with this file being the problem. It's the driver to my santa cruz sound card far as I can tell, but reinstalling the driver doesn't do anything.

Rad2owns May 22, 2006 12:12 PM

System specs and driver revisions would be helpful.

Djinn May 23, 2006 02:07 PM

Try this... Sync your watch to your PC clock. Next time you get the BSOD, note the time. When you finally boot up, run the Event Viewer (Start > Run > Eventvwr). Look through the logs (all categories), see if anything suspicious was recorded at the time of the BSOD. Double click the entry, jot down anything useful, and then go pay a visit to the Google gods.

mizzer May 24, 2006 10:20 AM

I have a related question:

If I have BeyondTV (like TiVo for the PC) set to record a show @ a particular time will the computer come out of "Standby" to record the show?
I've not had use for the function yet but I've always wondered about it.

Djinn May 24, 2006 03:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mizzer
I have a related question:

If I have BeyondTV (like TiVo for the PC) set to record a show @ a particular time will the computer come out of "Standby" to record the show?
I've not had use for the function yet but I've always wondered about it.

Not sure, but it's easy enough to test. I used to have a tuner card that would actually turn on your PC from scratch about five minutes before it was time to record, and then turn it off afterwards. Of course, your motherboard had to support the feature.


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